Slow Fish Caribe

Slow Fish Caribe

Photos

  • The black crab is an earth crab species found in some islands of the Caribbean area; in Colombia it lives only in San Andrés, Providencia and Santa Catalina

    Fundación ACUA
  • The Providencia Black Crab (Gecarcinus ruricola) lives in the forest ecosystem and spends his whole life between the forest and the sea. Adults feed themselves with organic matter from the bush and move to the sea to spawn.

    Fundación ACUA
  • A female crab bearing her eggs. The black crab population has decreased due to habitat loss, overexploitation and high mortality caused by vehicles that crush them when they cross the road in their reproductive migration.

    Corporación CORALINA
  • The traditional cuisine in San Andrés and Providencia gives values to the coastal ecosystem’s biodiversity and promotes habits and gastronomic local cultures that are based on it richness.

    Fundación ACUA
  • The Providence black crab is a unique patrimony of the islands of Providencia and Santa Catalina: its cultural, social and community value shows up in the daily life, in the festivals, music, songs, myths and legends. On the islands, the Providence Black Crab Festival is held every year in November.

    Fundación ACUA
  • At the Providence Black Crab Festival, children and adults can enjoy activities and games that help raise awareness on this important resource, vital to local communities and families of the San Andrés and Santa Catalina archipelago.

    Fundación ACUA
  • Pterois is a genus of venomous marine fish, commonly named as lionfish.

    Corporación CORALINA, Alfredo Abril Howard
  • Many national plans have been studied in order to control and manage the lionfish increasing population by setting a captures strategy, thus safeguarding the marine ecosystem.

    Corporación CORALINA
  • An essential element of these management and control strategies has being the promotion of the lionfish’s consume. Starting with many chefs’ support, the local gastronomy adapted itself including this new species in restaurants’ menus and promoting its tasty meat as a delicacy.

    Nikola J. Simpson, Slow Food Barbados
  • Many other activities have been supported for an integrated management of the lionfish: fishing and diving competitions, gastronomic festivals and also jewellery and art classes with the fish discards.

    Corporación CORALINA
  • Along the Mexican Caribbean coast of Quintana Roo lie the Sian Ka’an and Banco Chinchorro Biosphere Reserves. The local Caribbean spiny lobster (Panulirus argus) is called chakay following its meaning in Mayan language

    Colectividad Razonatura A.C.
  • Along the Mexican Caribbean coast of Quintana Roo lie the Sian Ka’an and Banco Chinchorro Biosphere Reserves. The local Caribbean spiny lobster (Panulirus argus) is called chakay following its meaning in Mayan language

    Colectividad Razonatura A.C.
  • Along the Mexican Caribbean coast of Quintana Roo lie the Sian Ka’an and Banco Chinchorro Biosphere Reserves. The local Caribbean spiny lobster (Panulirus argus) is called chakay following its meaning in Mayan language

    Colectividad Razonatura A.C.
  • Fishermen work with “casitas” also called “sombras”

    Colectividad Razonatura A.C.
  • Local fishermen operate in an unique and very sustainable way. Communities are organized in cooperatives, who divide the sea in underwater lots, called campos, which are allocated to, and managed by each member of the cooperative. The cooperatives attribute a parcel to every fishing family (campo) to take care of and harvest, as shown on the map.

    Colectividad Razonatura A.C.
  • The catch is thoroughly monitored to understand any change and to record all catches. Cooperatives of the biosphere reserve have come together to create a brand that links their sustainable catch to the place where it comes from, to differentiate them on the market.

    Colectividad Razonatura A.C.